5 things you can learn from Twitter’s new analytics

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Whether you’re a brand curious about how your tweets are faring or an individual longing to gaze into your social-media navel, Twitter’s opening of its analytics dashboard this week is sure to excite you. Twitter first launched Google-esque analytics to its advertisers and verified users back in July, but now, anyone can go to the dashboard site to see how far and wide your tweets go.

For users new to Twitter analytics, the results are surprising:

  • First, a negative: Fewer people are exposed to your tweets than you might think. A Twitter account with about 10,000 followers will, on average, have each tweet seen by only 300 to 500 people. This intuitively makes sense, since obviously not everyone is using Twitter at all hours of the day, and your 9 a.m. missive about coffee is buried in the stream by the time another user logs in an hour later. Still, Twitter reach is less than expected.
  • Second, a positive: “Engagement rates” are through the roof. Twitter defines “engagement” as a user taking any action on your tweet, such as clicking on a link, favoriting it, retweeting it, or replying. While the standard interaction rate on normal banner ads is about 0.07%, Twitter interaction rates hover around 2.5%. This appears to be a decline from a few years ago (in 2011, Twitter boasted on its blog that brand interaction rates were 3-5%), but 2.5% is still amazing — users exposed to your tweet are basically 36 times more likely to take an action than if they saw a digital banner ad.
  • Third, click-through rates are also very high. Using my personal account @benkunz as an example, from Aug. 1-28 I sent out 109 tweets, of which 34 had links. The tweets with links generated a 1.70% click-through rate based on 330 clicks against 19,380 actual impressions. More than two-thirds of my Twitter interactions were clicks, and that CTR is 24 times higher than the average banner ad response rate. The caveat here, of course, is I’m not a brand trying to sell you anything, just a human trying to be interesting, but that response rate bodes well for any brand with an authentic, meaningful content stream on Twitter.
  • Fourth, if you want your tweets shared: News tied to the zeitgeist of Twitter chatter works. In our non-scientific-but-super-insightful study of what tweets have the highest interaction rates, missives related to current events usually have 2x or 3x the average Twitter interaction rate. In the past few weeks, our tweets about Matt Damon doing something innovative with the ice bucket challenge, Starbucks redesigning its stores, or Robin Williams being photographed as a mime in Central Park in 1975 had much higher interaction rates that our supposedly smart asides on life, liberty and the pursuit of advertising. News, on Twitter, sells.
  • Fifth, timing matters. We found the highest interaction rates on Wednesdays, Fridays and Saturdays, and the lowest on Sundays and Mondays. Apparently Twitter users back away from social media on Sundays and are too buried in work on Mondays to spend much time interacting.

Wisely, or perhaps sadly, Twitter only allows you to see analytics on your own  tweets. As of now, you can’t view the Twitter activity of Pepsi or Robert Scoble to parse how big brands or social-media celebrities are faring with their own Twitter messages. But if you want to examine your own tweets to see what makes people respond, the dashboard is an excellent resource.

Of course, the other option is you could continue to just be yourself online and share real, authentic insights and news not worrying about what other people think. Brands and humans, we’ll leave that up to you.

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